Co-exploratory climate risk workshops: Experiences from urban Africa

jclimriskClimate Risk Management, April 2016
A. Steynor, J. Padgham, C. Jack, B. Hewitson, C. Lennard

Abstract

Co-production is increasingly recognized as integral to appropriate use and uptake of climate information into decision-making. However, the success of co-production is contingent on an innate understanding of the context in which it is being implemented. Climate knowledge co-production in Africa is unique and requires a nuanced approach because of the immediacy of a myriad of decision challenges on the continent, thereby making it more challenging to engage decision-makers in co-production processes around climate. Given these challenges, the process described here, referred to as “co-exploration”, was designed to complement the multi-stressor decision-making context of various African cities. Users and producers of science work together in an equitable framework to co-explore the urban decision-making space. While the dialogue has potential to inform the development of the science, it is not an explicit expectation of the process.

The paper describes the context for a place-based co-exploratory analysis of climate risks, the elements and steps incorporated in the approach, reflections on the effectiveness of this approach in addressing multi-stressor, place-based decision-making and the challenges that still remain in further refining the approach. The co-exploration approach is complementary to the objectives of the Global Framework for Climate Services and provides lessons for uptake of climate information into urban adaptation planning in Africa.

COMPENDIUM: Report and Guidance from USAID’s “Climate Change Resilient Development” Project

USAID CCRD Compendium Project Final ReportThe Climate Change Resilient Development (CCRD) project was a four-year project (2011-2015) implemented under the leadership of the Global Climate Change Office in the United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID’s) Bureau for Economic Growth, Education, and Environment (E3). The project goal was to “enhance resilience of developing country peoples, assets, and livelihoods through improved design of USAID programs and increased capacity to respond to climate change impacts.”

This compendium has been prepared to describe CCRD activities, products, findings, and key accomplishments. It also provides links to connect USAID Bureaus and Missions and international practitioners to the large library of project resources, including tools, guidance, training materials, technical reports, and journal articles. In addition, the CCRD team provided some suggestions for future work to advance USAID’s development first approach to climate adaptation.

Read more and download the USAID CCRD Compendium here.

Article in All India Disaster Mitigation Institute’s Publication

136 Snet Children and Humanitarian Assistance in South AsiaSTART was pleased to contribute to the September 2015 issue (#136) of Southasiadisasters.net on ‘Children and Humanitarian Assistance in South Asia’.

You can download the full publication AIDMI’s website http://www.aidmi.org/publications.aspx.

Our article, “START: Two Decades of Impact in Asia,” can be found on page 15, as shown below.  

 

START article - page 15

 

How can climate change adaptation in the semi-arid regions of West Africa be more effective and widespread? Evidence from Ghana and Mali

Adaptation at Scale in Semi-Arid Regions (ASSAR) is a research project being undertaken in the semi-arid regions of Africa and Asia, examining the dynamics and drivers of vulnerability, while exploring ways to enhance the resilience of people, local organisations and governments. ASSAR aims to promote climate adaptation policies and practices that are effective, widespread and sustainable. In West Africa, ASSAR focuses on the dry sub-humid band that extends from the Upper West Region of northern Ghana through to southern Mali, referred to as the Wa-Bobo-Sikasso transect. This briefing note summarizes the key findings from the Regional Diagnostic Study (RDS) recently conducted in Ghana and Mali, as part of the ASSAR project.

Planning for Climate Change in the Dryland Areas of West Africa

Adaptation at Scale in Semi-Arid Regions (ASSAR) is a research project being undertaken in the semi-arid regions of Africa and Asia, examining the dynamics and drivers of vulnerability, while exploring ways to enhance the resilience of people, local organisations and governments. ASSAR aims to promote climate adaptation policies and practices that are effective, widespread and sustainable. In West Africa, ASSAR focuses on the dry sub-humid band that extends from the Upper West Region of northern Ghana through to southern Mali, referred to as the Wa-Bobo-Sikasso transect.